Ouch! Wisconsin’s 5 most-Googled injuries (& their symptoms)

Credit: Rosenfeld Injury Lawyers

By Christina Lorey

January 30, 2024

Have you ever been injured and immediately turned to Google for answers? You’re not alone.

A personal injury law firm, Rosenfeld Injury Lawyers, analyzed Google data to determine which injuries people in each state are searching for the most.

Click on the underlined text for verified medical information from the Mayo Clinic about the symptoms, diagnosis, and possible treatments for each.

5. Poisoning

With 2,225 searches in an average month, poisoning is Wisconsin’s fifth most-Google condition. Poisoning can occur in different ways, either by swallowing, inhaling, injecting, or splashing.

4. Muscle strains

At number four are muscle strains with nearly 2,700 Google searches a month. Acute strains can be caused by a simple event, like using poor body posture to lift something heavy. Chronic muscle strains happen from repeating the same motion. Strains account for 55% of all sports injuries.

3. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Number three is carpal tunnel syndrome, with roughly 3,500 Google searches a month. Carpal tunnel syndrome is pressure on a nerve on the wrist that causes pain and numbness in the hand and fingers. According to the National Library of Medicine, Carpal tunnel surgery is the most common wrist and hand procedure in America.

DID YOU KNOW? There are also disability benefits available for people that have been diagnosed with Carpal tunnel. You may qualify if the symptoms are severe enough to interfere with your ability to work. Click here for more information.

2. Shin Splints

In second place is shin splints with 3,700 average searches a month. Usually caused by exercise, shin splints can cause tenderness or pain along the inner side of your shinbone and mild swelling in your lower leg.

1. Bursitis

Coming in at number one as Wisconsin’s most-Googled injury is bursitis, with more than 4,000 average searches each month. Symptoms include joint pain and swelling, and the condition is often caused by jobs that require repetitive movements or prolonged pressure on joints.

Author

  • Christina Lorey

    Christina is an Edward R. Murrow-winning journalist and former producer, reporter, and anchor for TV stations in Madison and Moline. When she’s not writing or asking questions, you can find her volunteering with Girls on the Run, the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, and various mental health organizations.

CATEGORIES: HEALTHCARE

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