House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., joined by fellow Democrats, enrolls the bipartisan bill designed to encourage more semiconductor companies to build chip plants in the United States, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday, July 29, 2022. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., joined by fellow Democrats, enrolls the bipartisan bill designed to encourage more semiconductor companies to build chip plants in the United States, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday, July 29, 2022. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Ron Johnson, Wisconsin’s Republican U.S. Senator, voted against historic legislation last month that will boost America’s economic and national security. The “Chips & Science” Bill passed the U.S. Senate on a bipartisan vote 64-33 and will be signed into law by President Joe Biden in the coming days.

Fourteen Republican Senators supported the bill over Johnson’s objections, including Texas Republican John Cornyn, who said, in part, that the legislation will, “kick start domestic production of these semiconductors in a way that will prevent a vulnerability of our supply chain since 90 percent of those advanced semiconductors currently come from Asia.”

Cornyn is referring to several core components of the law, which is expected to:

  • Expand semiconductor production in the U.S.
  • Turbocharge research and development into advanced manufacturing.
  • Incentivize manufacturers to reshore jobs making semiconductors from overseas competitors like China.
  • In an appearance on Fox Business, Johnson referred to those policies as “stupid.”

Jonathan Lipp, a Wisconsin small business owner who sells audio and visual technologies and equipment, reacted to Johnson’s no vote by saying, “It’s increasingly clear he [Ron Johnson] is more interested in playing political games and putting his [self-serving] agenda ahead of what’s best for Wisconsin. Instead of standing up for us – small businesses, consumers, and all Wisconsinites – he’s siding with China.”

Wisconsin’s Democratic U.S. Senator, Tammy Baldwin, voted for the legislation.