In this April 2020 photo, a refrigerated truck sits outside Aurora Sinai hospital in Milwaukee as a temporary morgue in the early weeks of the coronavirus outbreak.
In this April 2020 photo, a refrigerated truck sits outside Aurora Sinai hospital in Milwaukee as a temporary morgue in the early weeks of the coronavirus outbreak. (Photo by Jonathon Sadowski)

State had 25 deaths one week ago

Coronavirus has now killed 104 people in Wisconsin, according to official figures released Wednesday morning.

Just one week ago on April 1, deaths were at 25 while confirmed cases had just surpassed 1,500.

As of Thursday afternoon, the number of positive cases is 2,756, with 790 of those cases requiring hospitalization. The total number of people who have tested negative is 30,115, according to the state Department of Health Services

The virus has spread to all but 10 of the state’s 72 counties. Those counties include: Burnett, Forest, Green Lake, Lincoln, Pepin, Price, Sawyer, Taylor, Vernon and Washburn.

Areas with the most cases continue to be Milwaukee County with 1,491, Dane County with 305, Waukesha with 174, Kenosha with 129, Racine with 77, Ozaukee with 70, Fond du Lac 48, Brown 47, Sheboygan 31, Columbia 24 and Eau Claire with 21.

The grim milestone in the number of coronavirus-related deaths was reached the day after Wisconsin proceeded with in-person voting amid the pandemic, resulting in thousands of voters standing in long lines in Milwaukee and Green Bay. The election was held despite Gov. Tony Evers’ attempt to delay it. 

Full history of Wisconsin’s COVID-19 cases through April 7 according to daily reports from the state Department of Health Services

State Republicans successfully argued and the conservative-led state Supreme Court ruled that Evers could not unilaterally delay the election under emergency powers. Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes dubbed the election “The Shit Show.”

Clad in full-body personal protective equipment, including a mask, gloves, and gown, Republican Assembly Speaker Robin Vos claimed it was “incredibly safe to go out” Tuesday as he worked polls in Burlington. Other Republican lawmakers also posted photos of their polling place PPE, leading to online criticism about the amount of PPE that could have gone to medical workers instead as hospitals face dire shortages.