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The Do’s and Don’ts of Election Day Selfies

<strong>The Do’s and Don’ts of Election Day Selfies</strong>

By Christina Lorey

October 19, 2022

Did you really vote if you didn’t snap a picture? Before you proudly show off your ‘I Voted’ sticker, let’s consult Wisconsin’s election laws.

An Election Day selfie seems innocent enough, but you’ll want to double-check local laws to avoid paying a hefty fine or even getting prison time.

We’re not kidding.

Until 2020, taking a photo with your ballot was discouraged by law in Wisconsin. But thanks to legislation passed before the last presidential election, Wisconsin voters can legally snap selfies with their ballots… as long they haven’t been filled out.

The Badger state is one of 18 states with a law barring the showing of a completed ballot, although it’s rarely enforced. Legally, you’re not supposed to show your marked ballot to anyone

TL;DR–

DO: Encourage your friends and family to vote with a simple selfie

DON’T: Show them who you officially voted for

Another thing to keep in mind: You’re not supposed to do anything that causes a distraction inside your polling place, so stick with the selfie (don’t ask someone inside to take a picture of you!)

Other states with odd laws

Illinois: Taking a ballot selfie is a Class 4 felony, which comes with a sentence of one to three years in prison and a fine up to $25,000.  

Michigan: Voters are allowed to take photos of their paper ballot, but not themselves. In fact, any pictures inside the polling place, besides in the booth, are illegal. 

Minnesota: Selfies are okay, but voters are banned from taking photos of their marked ballots.

As for Wisconsin, as long as you’re not causing any disruptions, snap away and share your selfies to encourage your friends and family to vote. And tag us, too, using the hashtag: #IVotedWithUpNorthNews.

Author

  • Christina Lorey

    Christina is an Edward R. Murrow-winning journalist and former producer, reporter, and anchor for TV stations in Madison and Moline. When she’s not writing or asking questions, you can find her volunteering with Girls on the Run, the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, and various mental health organizations.

CATEGORIES: VOTING
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